Friday, May 25

Spinning 2.x: Julie Roehm

If the art of spin is part of Julie Roehm's marketing 2.x concept, she's certainly trying to employ it in court. Roehm's defense tactic against Wal-Mart is to exonerate herself by accusing executives at the #1 retailer of ignoring company ethics policy.

She says they accepted trips and gifts from clients and benefited from preferential prices on jewelry and yachts, implying that maybe that makes it okay that she broke the company's ethics policy by accepting gifts from agencies pitching the Wal-Mart account last November and having what seems to have been a heated affair with a subordinate.

According to The New York Times, the filing says "While Wal-Mart asserts that it has policies which prohibit conflicts of interest and the misuse of Wal-Mart assets and opportunities, those policies do not seem to prevent its executives from using both to personal advantage.”

The story is also generating buzz at The Wall Street Journal and CNN Money. Each publisher has a slightly different take on the story, ranging from outlining Roehm's claims in some detail to brushing them off as a weak defense.

It's difficult to tell what the court might think, given this tactic seems to play more to the media than her case. On the quick, it reminds me of a defense similar to one my then 7-year-old son cooked up about a year ago. "Why were you throwing rocks at that house?" I asked. So-and-so "threw rocks at the house first" was his defense. Ho hum.

Since her termination last December, Roehm has fared the worst of the three most cited in this case study. Other than landing a gig at Sports Illustrated, most businesses have given her a lukewarm reception since she filed the wrongful termination case against Wal-Mart. Meanwhile, DraftFCB won K-mart and Wal-Mart stocks are up on the market.
Digg!

2 comments:

Rich on 5/29/07, 2:46 PM said...

Famous Words:

"In a telephone interview with The Associated Press, Jacobs called Roehm's attacks untrue and "outrageous" and vowed that if Roehm declines to retract her statement, he will sue her and her lawyer." — Anne D'Innocenzio, Associated Press

Rich on 6/1/07, 2:37 PM said...

More Words:

"Wal-Mart Stores Inc. Chief Executive H. Lee Scott, who recently was accused by a fired marketing executive of accepting sweetheart deals from suppliers, purchased a diamond ring from a Wal-Mart vendor, according to that vendor's officials.

Mr. Scott purchased the ring for his wife in April 2003 from The Aaron Group, a wholesale supplier of jewelry to Wal-Mart, said Robert Kempler, president of the New York-based company. Mr. Kempler declined to discuss the terms of the diamond sale other than to say Mr. Scott hadn't received preferential pricing." — James Bandler and Gary McWilliams, The Wall Street Journal

Post a Comment

 

Blog Archive

Google+ Followers

by Rich Becker Copyright © 2010 Designed by Bie Blogger Template